Egypt's Red Sea resorts: your complete guide

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Who's dreaming of Egypt's hot and sunny shores? Here, we take a look at the resorts of the Red Sea Riviera with everything you need to know about planning a holiday to this glorious sandy stretch of the Egyptian coast.

Guide to Egypt's Red Sea Riviera - photo courtesy of Egyptian Tourism Authority
Guide to Egypt's Red Sea Riviera - photo courtesy of Egyptian Tourism Authority

We'll give you the lowdown on the area's resorts, activities, possible excursions and customs to help you research and plan a well-deserved getaway in 2022/2023.

Getting to Egypt: browse the latest deals on holidays to this region of Egypt with TUI*.

Why visit the Red Sea?

Egypt's beach resorts have been enticing Brits for years thanks to their combination of white sandy beaches, year-round sunshine and warm sea, all just a short five-hour flight and a two-hour time difference away.

One of many pools at the Alf Leila Wa Leila Hotel, Hurghada, Egypt © E v Schoonhoven - Wikimedia Commons
One of many pools at the Alf Leila Wa Leila Hotel, Hurghada, Egypt © E v Schoonhoven - Wikimedia Commons

If you're an adrenaline junkie you'll find some amazing activities to check off your bucket list here; how about diving with sharks, quad biking in the desert or taking a camel ride before tucking into a full Bedouin feast?

Egypt is also a shopper's paradise where you can stock up on alabaster, have hieroglyphics etched on papyrus or ogle oriental lamps and leather goods while taking in the aroma of exotic spices.

Which resort is right for you?

So, where exactly should you go on your Egyptian beach holiday? Egypt is four times the size of the UK and blessed with a Mediterranean Sea coast to the north and a stunning stretch along the west coast of the Red Sea. It's here that most of the country's popular beach resorts can be found.

With lots of areas offering sun-soaked Red Sea beach breaks, such as Sharm el Sheikh, Hurghada, El Gouna, and Marsa Alam, deciding where to go can be bewildering but don't worry, Egypt is a straightforward holiday destination once you understand the differences between each resort.

Sharm el Sheikh

Located on the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula on part of Egypt's Red Sea coast, Sharm el Sheikh* is the old favourite of many holidaymakers who revel in the dry, hot and sunny conditions that bathe the region almost year-round.

Hotel on the beach at Ras Nasrani, Sharm el Sheikh © Eric Gevaert - Adobe Stock Image
Hotel on the beach at Ras Nasrani, Sharm el Sheikh © Eric Gevaert - Adobe Stock Image

Having been out of bounds to tourists for a number of years, Sharm, as it is often affectionately known for short, is now firmly back on the holiday map. Expect azure seas, fantastic coral reefs, diverse fish species, water sports and delicious cuisine, all served up with high temperatures and unrivalled sunbathing opportunities.

Just some of the exciting places you can swim, snorkel and dive on holiday in Sharm include:

  • Naama Bay - this much-loved beach at the heart of the resort is lined with a long promenade full of cafés and shops; don't miss the chance to snorkel the Garden Reefs, a collection of easy-to-access corals lying to the north of the bay.
  • Ras Mohamed Nature Reserve - just over 20 miles south of Sharm, this area boasts some of the world's best dive sites, such as Yolanda Reef, as well as beautiful beaches, aim for Aqaba Beach and places to snorkel (try Old Quay Beach). There's also a mangrove forest and a saltwater lake.
  • Shark's Bay - a stylish, popular spot for beach lovers, it's another excellent place to snorkel, book diving lessons and try watersports such as banana boat rides.
  • Boat trip around Tiran Island - this large island that can be seen from the shore makes for an exciting trip by boat; step aboard for a day of snorkelling and/or diving in the waters around this great granite mound located at the Straits of Tiran in the Red Sea.
  • Ras Um Sid Beach - lying at the southern end of the Sinai Peninsula, close to the lighthouse, this another wonderful bay with turquoise waters for swimming, snorkelling and diving expeditions.

Meanwhile, away from the water, there's a wealth of things to do from visiting neighbourhoods to day excursions, including the following:

  • Mount Sinai & St Catherine's Monastery - beat the sunrise on a day's excursion up historic Mount Sinai, with a stop at the UNESCO site of St Catherine's Monastery, one of the oldest working Christian monasteries in the world and home of the world's oldest operating library.
  • White Knight Bay - head here for sophisticated bars, fine restaurants, late-night cocktails and dancing.
  • Shop at the Old Market - haggle over Egyptian souvenirs such as wood carvings, lanterns, textiles and spices in the town's bazaar before sampling fine local cooking in one of the low-key cafés.

Where to stay: check out Coral Sea Water World*, a resort with its own waterpark on site.

Hurghada

Hurghada* is the largest resort town on the Egyptian mainland and has been a popular place for Egyptians to holiday long before Europeans cottoned on to the gorgeous sandy beaches, balmy days and lively nights on offer here.

Unlike many of the well-known Red Sea resorts, Hurghada is also an urban centre with history and culture in abundance, making it a great place to enjoy a taste of the real Egypt.

So, while Hurghada offers the lion's share of well-equipped resorts, you'll probably want to explore a little at one of the local markets and eateries as well.

The new El Mina Mosque in Hurghada, Red Sea Riviera, Egypt © Chris Hutchison  - Flickr Creative Commons
The new El Mina Mosque in Hurghada, Red Sea Riviera, Egypt © Chris Hutchison - Flickr Creative Commons

You will find plenty of things to do in Hurghada for families from water parks to bowling alleys, and as the biggest and busiest of all the resorts, Hurghada undoubtedly has the most vibrant nightlife.

This is also a watersports paradise for everyone from the complete novice to the most accomplished expert; snorkel right off the beach, hire a jet ski or go windsurfing or paragliding; you'll be spoilt for choice.

Boating is an option, too, with glass-bottomed boat trips and the opportunity to go fishing or to take a cruise out to one of the nearby islands.

Hurghada is large enough to be split into distinct areas and within the greater Hurghada area you'll find:

  • Dahar: the authentic local heart of downtown Hurghada, this is the place to seek out bazaars and bargains and see another side of the city.
  • The Promenade (Village Road): in Arabic El Memsha; this three-mile-long stretch is home to large hotels, malls, shops and restaurants.
  • Sekala: meaning the marina or boardwalk in Arabic, this is the oldest part of Hurghada with a bustling centre for shopping, local life and tourism.
  • Soma Bay: the most southerly of Hurghada's resort areas and the closest to Luxor, Soma Bay is a luxurious enclave consisting of a golf course and a handful of luxury hotels.
  • Makadi Bay: an informal resort area with plenty of family-friendly hotels including the fun of Makadi Bay Water World, about half an hour south of Hurghada itself.
  • Sahl Hasheesh: a highly exclusive and tranquil resort 11 miles south of Hurghada airport, the gorgeous curved sandy bay attracts a discerning clientele.

El Gouna

Styled as the 'Venice of Egypt', it's not surprising that El Gouna has a different and more European feel compared to the rest of Egypt's Red Sea Riviera resorts. For a start, there's a 'no haggling or hassling' rule in place.

So, despite being around only 14 miles north of Hurghada and served by the same airport, El Gouna has carved a special niche for itself when it comes to attracting tourists.

The Three Corners Rihana Resort, El Gouna, Egypt © Marc Ryckaert - Wikimedia Commons
The Three Corners Rihana Resort, El Gouna, Egypt © Marc Ryckaert - Wikimedia Commons

Those looking for an upmarket and chilled-out holiday vibe with laid back nightlife to match may find El Gouna the right fit. Plus, there tend to be more bed and breakfast or half board options at hotels in El Gouna, which are set around a manmade marina and sprinkle of islands.

There's also a sporty side to El Gouna with world-class golf courses and special facilities for kitesurfing, wakeboarding and waterskiing.

Marsa Alam

Marsa Alam* is a haven for nature lovers, outdoor enthusiasts, and sun-worshippers alike, boasting the highest temperatures on this part of the coast, as well as the warmest winter evenings in the whole of Egypt.

Around 168 miles south of Hurghada, Marsa Alam has been welcoming tourists for around two decades and is served by its own international airport ensuring the perfect combination of accessibility and tranquillity.

As the newest region on the Red Sea Riviera, Marsa Alam still feels like the traditional fishing village it once was while building a reputation for pristine beaches, fishing, diving and cruises and offering a more convenient base for exploring Luxor compared with Hurghada.

Only the protected nature reserves and national parks of Wadi el-Gemal and Elba lie between here and the Sudanese border, so if your idea of a great day out is to experience coral reefs, marine reserves and beautiful secluded bays, then the biodiversity of Marsa Alam will be for you.

Swimming with dolphins on the Red Sea Riviera, Egypt © Jeaaann - Wikimedia Commons
Swimming with dolphins on the Red Sea Riviera, Egypt © Jeaaann - Wikimedia Commons

Divers have the opportunity to explore shallow wrecks and meet hammerhead sharks at the world-class Elphinstone Reef and you can even swim with dolphins and snorkel with sea turtles and dugongs.

As an understated and marine-focused destination, nightlife outside the resorts here tends to be low key but Port Ghalib is where you can find a relaxed bar scene.

Stay up to date: keep an eye on the FCDO website for the latest travel information regarding holidays to Egypt.

Day trips

Most people choose a holiday here to enjoy the perpetually warm waters and guaranteed sunshine but once your batteries are recharged you can soak up some of the country's natural attractions and ancient sites, too.

Cairo & The Great Pyramids of Giza

Today the pyramids at Giza are the only wonders of the ancient world that remain standing, and you can take a day trip to Cairo to marvel at the Great Pyramid as well as those at Memphis, Dahshur and Sakkara.

You'll also experience the unforgettable throng of Egypt's largest metropolis, Cairo, and come face to face with the Sphinx and the golden mask of Tutankhamun in the Egyptian Museum.

Luxor

One of the benefits of choosing to base yourself by the Red Sea is that you can tie in a visit to Egypt's world-famous archaeological treasures, including the Valley of the Kings and Queens, at Luxor.

Although perhaps a bit far for a day trip, you can book an organised excursion with an overnight stay. Do this and you could be rewarded with the magic of the Karnak Sound and Light Show at Karnak Temple.

Cleopatra's Emerald Mines

Just outside Marsa Alam in Wadi el Gamal National Park, Cleopatra's Mines are thought to be the first emerald mine in the entire world.

Named after the Egyptian queen who had a love of fine jewellery, the gold, emeralds and semi-precious stones found here were revered internationally.

Vital stats for visiting the Red Sea

  • Flight time from the UK: around five hours, making it the shortest flight time from the UK for consistent winter sun, as well as the closest destination offering year-round snorkelling and diving.
  • Currency: the Egyptian Pound, which is currently great value for Brits travelling to Egypt, making it a very affordable holiday destination.
  • Tipping: it's helpful to keep small denominations of Egyptian Pounds, such as 10 EGP, for use as tips. Tipping for good service is customary in Egypt and, if you tip your waiter, barman or driver, you'll find not only is it much appreciated, but it will result in great service for you next time, especially in a resort environment.
  • Visas: you can apply for an e-visa via Visa2Egypt in advance or buy one on arrival for US$25 payable in dollars, pounds or euros.
  • In an emergency: the emergency numbers in Egypt are different from those in the UK, with unique numbers for each service. These are Police 122, Tourist Police 126, Ambulance 123 and Fire 180.
  • Voltage: Egypt runs on 220v using a two-pin socket like those in mainland Europe, so British appliances should work with an adaptor.

10 essential phrases for your holiday

Egyptians are warm, friendly, and welcoming to foreign tourists, and while many speak good English locals really smile on those who try their hand at a little Arabic. These Egyptian phrases could help you barter as well as banter, snagging a souvenir for a bargain:

  • Yes - Eye-wa
  • No - La'a
  • Come on / let's go / hurry up - Y'alla
  • Thank you - Shukran
  • You're welcome - Afwan
  • I don't want it - Ana Mish Ay'za (female) / Ana Mish Ay'is (male)
  • Excellent - Meya Meya (literally means '100, 100')
  • Wait here - Estanna hena
  • How Much? - Bikam?
  • Where Is...? - Fein...?

When to go to the Red Sea

One of the best things about a holiday in Egypt is the guaranteed year-round dry climate with masses of sunshine. Along the Red Sea coast in winter there is never fewer than nine hours of sunshine a day on average, rising to 13 hours a day in summer, and it very rarely rains, even in winter when rainfall is more likely.

It can be very hot in summer with daytime maximum temperatures rising into the mid-thirties but the lack of moisture in the air means that this can feel quite tolerable, so heat and humidity levels are moderated somewhat.

If you travel in the winter months, temperatures in the north of the Red Sea Riviera can fall below 10°C at night so you will need an extra layer or two for the evenings. This is typical for a desert climate where the heat of the day is quickly radiated back into the upper atmosphere. The effect is less pronounced in Marsa Alam in the south, which is always that bit warmer but winter evenings are still cool.

As for sea temperatures, again a little bit warmer in the south but generally ranging along the whole Red Sea Riviera from 22°C in winter to a warm 28°C in August and September.

With such warm and sunny weather conditions, it's not hard to see why the Red Sea Riviera is such a popular choice for British holidaymakers, especially in winter.

Weather along the Red Sea

  Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Maximum daytime temperature °C
Hours of sunshine (daily)
Days with some rainfall
Sea temperature °C

Above you'll see the climate in Marsa Alam. Find out more about the weather in Egypt and see when we think is the best time to go for ultimate beach holiday conditions.

Ready to discover Egypt's Red Sea coast? If this sounds like your kind of winter sun destination, check out the latest deals on beach holidays from TUI.

TUI: Save up to £200 on holidays in May & June 2022

More about Red Sea

  • Top deals & discounts
  • Red Sea weather overview
  • Red Sea climate averages by month
  • More destinations
  • Best time to go to Red Sea
  • Red Sea 5-day weather forecast

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec

Jaillan Yehia

Jaillan Yehia
Article updated on Wednesday 20th October 2021 in: Africa Beach TUI Winter sun

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